Fibroid Pregnancy

Fibroids are very common. It is estimated that between 25 and 80% of all women have uterine fibroids. Therefore many women who are pregnant will have a fibroid or fibroids. Many women who are trying to fall pregnant will have fibroids. It is easy to diagnose fibroids with ultrasound scanning, and most pregnant women have one or more ultrasound examinations. Before the advent of ultrasound scanning many women who were pregnant did not know that they had fibroids. Nowadays many women are diagnosed with fibroids during pregnancy.

If you have been diagnosed with a fibroid that is causing no symptoms and want to fall pregnant, then it is usually safe to continue to try to conceive. I would advise that you discuss your fibroid with your family doctor or gynaecologist if you are trying to fall pregnant. If you want to start a family or try to fall pregnant it is sensible to discuss this with your GP or gynaecologist anyway. This is because pre-conception counselling can improve the chances of having a healthy baby.

Uterine fibroids usually grow during pregnancy. Some fibroids will stay the same size and some may even shrink during pregnancy. If you are pregnant and a fibroid is diagnosed, it is quite likely that it has been present for some time, many months or even many years.

If you are having difficulty falling pregnant or if you have had recurrent miscarriages, then investigation is important. Gynaecologists recommend that a couple, without risk factors for infertility, that has been trying to conceive for a year or more, should have tests for infertility.

If a couple is known to have factors that make infertility more likely, then most doctors will advise that a gynaecology opinion is sought after 6 months of trying to conceive. The most common reason for earlier assessment is if the woman is 35 years old or older. Other factors include a woman having irregular periods or a man who has a history of chemotherapy.

If you are known to have fibroid or fibroid symptoms then it is advisable to seek investigation after 6 months of trying to conceive.

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